Toppohaus

toppohaus.com/tomgastall.com

May 28

Oct 9
Another portfolio piece: The Future

Another portfolio piece: The Future


Oct 8

architectureofdoom:

morphea:

michael light

Unbuilt Ascaya development looking Southeast after $250 million in mountaintop removal and terracing. Henderson, NV 2012.

architectureofdoom:

morphea:

michael light

Unbuilt Ascaya development looking Southeast after $250 million in mountaintop removal and terracing. Henderson, NV 2012.


brianmichaelbendis:

Kyle Baker ~ Some of his “It’s Genetic” panels from Marvel Age.

(via themarvelageofcomics)


New portfolio piece: Babyhead City

New portfolio piece: Babyhead City


May 27
architectureofdoom:

Owen Luder’s Gateshead Multi-Storey car park and Trinity Square shopping centre (RIP) from the junction of Ellison St and High St, Gateshead.

architectureofdoom:

Owen Luder’s Gateshead Multi-Storey car park and Trinity Square shopping centre (RIP) from the junction of Ellison St and High St, Gateshead.


decoarchitecture:

E… Edinburgh
St. Andrew’s House, Edinburgh, Scotlandby Roger Freedman
St. Andrew’s is the HQ of the Scottish government. 
From Wikipedia:

The building was designed by  Thomas S. Tait  of  Burnet, Tait and Lorne , architects, who won the architectural competition to gain the commission. Construction began in November 1935, and was completed in 1939, the building initially housed the  Scottish Office, including the offices of the  Secretary of State for Scotland. The requirement for the building arose as a result of a post  World War I policy of limited transfer of  devolved  administrative (but not legislative) power to Scotland from London. An official opening ceremony timed to take place on 12 October 1939 was “cancelled due to War” (Britain’s first air raid of the war took place only four days later over the  Forth Bridge). Instead, it was officially opened by King George VI and Queen Elizabeth on 26 February 1940.
Architecturally, the building is monolithic, symmetrical and restrained on the main north facade. To the south, facing the Waverley valley, it is much more irregular and romantic in expression. There are many Art Deco influences.
Tait’s design incorporates elements of Art Deco and Streamline Moderne and is noted for being a rare example of sensitively designed modern architecture in Edinburgh. 
The building features a number of sculpted decorations, also in the Art Deco style, which are credited to several sculptors: Sir William Reid Dick designed symbolic figures; heraldic devices are the work of Alexander Carrick and Phyllis Bone; the large bronze doors were designed by Walter Gilbert and executed by H.H. Martyn; and the secondary doors and stairs are by Thomas Hadden.
St Andrew’s House is designated a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland.

decoarchitecture:

E… Edinburgh

St. Andrew’s House, Edinburgh, Scotland
by Roger Freedman

St. Andrew’s is the HQ of the Scottish government. 

From Wikipedia:

The building was designed by  Thomas S. Tait  of  Burnet, Tait and Lorne , architects, who won the architectural competition to gain the commission. Construction began in November 1935, and was completed in 1939, the building initially housed the  Scottish Office, including the offices of the  Secretary of State for Scotland. The requirement for the building arose as a result of a post  World War I policy of limited transfer of  devolved  administrative (but not legislative) power to Scotland from London. An official opening ceremony timed to take place on 12 October 1939 was “cancelled due to War” (Britain’s first air raid of the war took place only four days later over the  Forth Bridge). Instead, it was officially opened by King George VI and Queen Elizabeth on 26 February 1940.

Architecturally, the building is monolithic, symmetrical and restrained on the main north facade. To the south, facing the Waverley valley, it is much more irregular and romantic in expression. There are many Art Deco influences.

Tait’s design incorporates elements of Art Deco and Streamline Moderne and is noted for being a rare example of sensitively designed modern architecture in Edinburgh. 

The building features a number of sculpted decorations, also in the Art Deco style, which are credited to several sculptors: Sir William Reid Dick designed symbolic figures; heraldic devices are the work of Alexander Carrick and Phyllis Bone; the large bronze doors were designed by Walter Gilbert and executed by H.H. Martyn; and the secondary doors and stairs are by Thomas Hadden.

St Andrew’s House is designated a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland.


Zut Alors.

Zut Alors.

(via mattfractionblog)


komalantz:

Maputo style part 2 by danieleb80 on Flickr.
Maputo, Mozambique.

komalantz:

Maputo style part 2 by danieleb80 on Flickr.

Maputo, Mozambique.

(via architectureofdoom)


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